WELCH&CONDON

Workers Compensation

IME’s

I seem to be getting a lot of questions about IME’s lately – so here’s a bit more on the topic.

If you have specific complaints about the way in which a medical exam ordered by the Department was conducted, put them in writing.  An IME Comments Form (F245‑053‑000) is available online, or you may call 1‑888‑784‑8059 to request a comment form. You can specify your preferred language. The Department has made efforts to improve the quality of physicians who are approved to perform IME’s, and does take comments and complaints seriously.

That said, these exams are a thorn in everyone’s side. However, they are with us to stay. There are a couple of things you can do.

Make sure you provide an accurate and complete history at your first medical visit following your injury. Often IME’s are ordered because the claims manager does not have a clear picture of how or where the accident occurred and is not sure whether to allow or reject the claim. I can’t tell you how many times I talk to a worker who saw a physician for their injury, but didn’t ‘mention’ it was work related. They didn’t think they were hurt that bad, wanted to keep their job, didn’t want to report it to L&I . . . whatever the reason, we’re working on cleaning up the discrepancy – and the CM orders an IME to try and get a clear picture of what happened.

Encourage your treating medical provider to provide detailed chart notes and comprehensive treatment plans to the claims manager. Often IME’s are ordered because the claims manager is not getting information from the Doctor. Make sure the AP is responding to all requests for information as timely as possible and is keeping the CM informed.

You must be proactive in your treatment. Often IME’s are ordered because treatment seems to be stalled with no discernible improvement over multiple follow up visits. If all the CM sees is the same chart note with a different date, no change in findings or treatment recommendations and instructions to follow up in 6 weeks, an IME is going to be ordered. This is especially true if you are not working. Your condition should be improving, treatment or diagnostic studies should be ordered and obtained smoothly. There should be progress.

When your medical condition stabilizes and its time to get a permanent impairment rating and close the claim, ask your AP to do the exam and the rating. The Department encourages treating physicians to provide PPD ratings for their patients. If your AP provides a rating, you are less likely to see an IME ordered. If your physician can’t or won’t provide an impairment rating, ask them to refer you to someone else to get the rating. They can refer you to a colleague or someone on the Department’s Approved list – in either case you may avoid having to attend an IME.

These steps may help avoid an IME in the first place. When an exam is scheduled, be prepared, be honest, do not exaggerate. (This topic should be an entire post!)

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March 20, 2012 - Posted by | attorney, injured workers, legal, WA workers compensation, workers compensation | , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments »

  1. What does IME stand for? This is the medical exam that is required?

    Comment by Barb | February 22, 2013 | Reply

    • IME is shorthand for Independent Medical Exam. I generally refer to them as Defense Medical Exams, nothing really ‘independent’ about them.

      Comment by Terri | February 22, 2013 | Reply


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